Comic 181 - Extras
20th Feb 2013, 11:53 PM in Star
Extras
Average Rating: 4.6 (5 votes) Rate this comic
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Author Notes:
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view
Some days I want to go back to sketch art.
User comments:
Im having a hardtime to imagine how this can end well...
RandomTroll
The jelly fish tank breaks, our little alien friend knows how to swim, the cyber-ops guys drown or get stung to death by jellies.

And Iri saw it coming and din't assign a body guard because he/she would have drowned.
Phuji
One of the best things about this comic is the fact that it's updated with 6 pages a week. Same with NMtG.

Your artistic progress improves each day which your regular readers have been able to see page by page since the start of this comic.

If nothing else, I appreciate the work you put into this.
No one forces you to put out 6 pages a week, every week, but you do.

So, as someone who checks this page 20 times a day awaiting the next page... thank you.

Just in case you aren't reminded often enough since you seem like you could use it today.
view
It's just that you can put in a lot of really nice details really quick when you're sketching. It's a real pain in the ass when you're painting.
cattservant
Do you mean that the 'language' you use has a strong influence on what you can 'say'?
view
Nah, I just mean that color is a pain in the assssssss.
Sheela
Ah, but the colors are so pretty !
And you know it.

Offcourse, you could always do it .. happier .. and with your mouth open. :)

I have to say though, that I'm in Phuji's camp - Your comic is much apprechiated.
Sheela
And .. and .. and .. .there she is .. and and there they are - And there's the letter !!

I'm dying to know what the letter is all about !
pensivedragon
"Some days I want to go back to sketch art."
So, why not do just that? I mean, if you are getting frustrated with your current colouring methods, why not try something completely different? Draw a few pages in your earlier style, maybe it will give you some new ideas.
Kain Yusanagi
I'll be the first to say it: those jellyfish look weeeeeeeeird. Not "quirky alien jellyfish" weird, but "tentacles that aren't where they should be" and "bodies that are like jellybeans with streamers" weird. Not sure if that was the effect you were going for here, or if it was just "k, frustrated with the colouring, lazy quick jellyfish GO!", or what; They just look... wrong. >.o

Here's a video reference for jellyfish feeding that actually goes into rather good detail on the components and has many different angles of a particular jellyfish (called the moon jellyfish): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2KTJ8GAWlEs

And another pair with several varieties that have varied tentacles, to better illustrate how they float compared to the main body, as well as how they are attached and move as the jellyfish swims: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c6LH_svUr5w and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gFLJSITYf-8

And another that details the Box Jellyfish, and provides more anatomical referencing for that specific species and jellyfish in general: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xDFANVXCtcY
pensivedragon
Not sure what you are getting at, they look fine to me. There are some species of jelly fish that have the tentacles attached to the outer 'bubble' like View has done here, and some with them all internal, and some with both. So I do not see anything wrong with how they are attached here. The way the tentacles are flowing in the water is also perfectly fine, it less crazy than some I have taken pictures of (see my images below).

Also these are not in fact jellyfish, or in anyway related to them. This being a completely different universe and all. So any particular part of *our* jellyfishes anatomy that happen to be absent does not really apply.

imageimage
Kain Yusanagi
If you look closely at the images you've shown, you'll notice that the tentacles are attached to the edge- the pulsating lip of the jellyfish that it uses to move, et al- and not to the surface of the beast, which some of the tentacles above do appear to be. Because of how they move the streamers of their tentacles remain either directly behind them, or directly to the side (if weighted by prey or if they've just turned); Several of the tentacles that view has drawn are haphazardly/erratically streaming that to me, looks wrong from how they do flare and move whilst the jellyfish moves. In your pictures you show the natural flow of the tentacles as the body is moving- The first shows it as it's turning, so it's partially to the side, but all tentacles remain behind the body. The second shows even more obviously the tentacles remain behind even when it is in full flex before jetting forward. Another example can be seen here: http://www.wilfridwong.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/spain_day06_jellyfish.jpg for the relative uniformity of the tentacle placement. Certainly, if it floats in one spot for long enough a few tentacles can drift to the sides even when oriented with its back facing up (standard position, tentacles hanging down), but the natural path of the tentacles is still inherant to their form- As seen here with this hydrozoa: http://cdn.zmescience.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/12/hydrozoa.jpg whilst a few tentacles may be out of alignment, they are statistical outliers not standard. This doesn't really matter, though, as the jellyfish visible in today's comic are all moving - well, are all locked in a frame of apparent movement, anyways.

The other issue I took- the "looks like a jellybean with streamers" part is more directly related to the upper left panel's upper right and bottom right specimens. The uppermost has the body flexing in a way that seems physically incorrect (in that the entire back is buldging whilst two of the four sides of the sphere are distended and the other two, across from each other, are retracted) and give it a lopsided jellybean look; The second one, whilst reasonably correct on the body's shape, is very opaque on the edge yet close to transparent on the center- when it's, in the species that demonstrate translucency, either the center dense mass that is closer to opaque (from all the layers of flesh and tentacles and stomachs et al), or the entire tenticular ring at the edge of the body that is closer to opaque not because of an actual translucency issue but because they are bioluminescent. Now, while this last I could ignore based on that they need to be made easily visible without making it too much work for View, and in fact didn't make my initial complaints list above, what I was getting at mainly with them is that the tentacles are quite obviously attached to the outer shell of the creature rather than the demonstratable edge of the hood, which is what I was remarking on them not being where they should be.

As for them being another species, in another universe, or not actually jellyfish at all- Whatever. Animals evolve as they do because they need to adapt to their biome. Given that they can exist within an earth-g variable gravity, that the water they swim in is the same (it is blue, and oxygen and hydrogen when in the molecule H2O produce a blue colouration intrinsically (has to do with a vibrational transition? http://www.dartmouth.edu/~etrnsfer/water.htm has one such explanation, which is backed by other sources that you can research yourself if so inclined); Whilst there could be copper deposits dissolved in the medium, it would result in a muddied colour if the base is not blue itself or if the base is not transparent; As mentioned above, H2O has an intrinsic colouration, and thus couldn't be the material, and as a staple building block of life as we know it, and demonstrated on the aquatic planet that Ayata is from, is far more likely to be the material in the glass tube than some other of an unknown chemical composition) even if they're Jellyfish "FROOOOOM SPAAAAAACE!!!!!" they share the same basic form and function evolutionary adaptations. These traits were already set at least 580 million years ago (the oldest recorded jellyfish fossil), so signs point to their form and function evolving similarly on other m-rated planets just fine. The fact that they're so large is probably more an indication of the megafauna phase of earth's history, or they could simply be a species that are in a dominant predator niche and could afford to grow larger- though Terran jellyfish already grow rather large as it is (see Nomura's jellyfish and Stygiomedusa gigantea, both in the 6 meter long tentacle range and with very large bodies (gigantea is a meter across, IIRC), or the Lion's Mane jellyfish which can sport tentacles growing over 35 metres long).

/end rant
pensivedragon
"If you look closely at the images you've shown, you'll notice that the tentacles are attached to the edge- the pulsating lip of the jellyfish that it uses to move, et al- and not to the surface of the beast, which some of the tentacles above do appear to be"

Yes, I know. But like I said, some jellyfish DO have them attached to the surface.

image

"Several of the tentacles that view has drawn are haphazardly/erratically streaming that to me, looks wrong from how they do flare and move whilst the jellyfish moves. In your pictures you show the natural flow of the tentacles as the body is moving"

Yes, mine have some natural flow to them, but they ALSO have a TON of erratic tentacle movement, not just a few statistical outliers, which is what I was pointing out.
Also, you need to take size into account. Views jellyfish are many meters long, so if they are moving slowly, slight water eddies and currents would have lots of chances to move their tentacles out of seamless alignment.

And that is not even taking into account that the creatures may be using the tentacles themselves as propulsion, like an eel. They are quite thick afterall, and may not be just trailing behind them limply.

You bring up some good points that the liquid could be water. But it is hardly the only transparent liquid. It could still be something like hydrofluoric acid, or some other such chemical. Every jellyfish aquarium I have ever seen uses coloured lighting, making positive identification of the liquid by colour very difficult, if the same is the case here.

"or the Lion's Mane jellyfish which can sport tentacles growing over 35 metres long"
The first pictures I posted were Lions Mane jellyfish. I was drysuit scubadiving with them up in Alaska. They are VERY cool. You don't really get a sense of scale in the pictures, but they were HUGE.
Kain Yusanagi
"Yes, I know. But like I said, some jellyfish DO have them attached to the surface."

No, nonono. You're assuming I'm saying that tentacles attached to the outer layer is "the surface". I mean that some of them look as if attached to the outer surface of the outermost layer, ie not at the edge of the layer, but on the surface of it. I tried to clear that up but apparently I wasn't able to well enough.

"Yes, mine have some natural flow to them, but they ALSO have a TON of erratic tentacle movement, not just a few statistical outliers, which is what I was pointing out."

The erratic movement is natural though, which is what I was trying to point out. A few tentacles might be off on their own, but the majority of the tentacles will move with the flow- If the jellyfish is jetting, they'll stream behind it. If it's just floating, they will be influenced by the currents and eddies natural to the body of water they are within, plus given that close space would also likely be affected by the currents kicked up as the others jet about- yet, even the most erratic tentacle first flows away from the main body before then floating out in whatever direction based on movement and currents. Several tentacles above do not, from how I look at them.

"And that is not even taking into account that the creatures may be using the tentacles themselves as propulsion, like an eel. They are quite thick afterall, and may not be just trailing behind them limply."

True enough! I never even considered such a thing.

"But it is hardly the only transparent liquid. It could still be something like hydrofluoric acid, or some other such chemical. Every jellyfish aquarium I have ever seen uses coloured lighting, making positive identification of the liquid by colour very difficult, if the same is the case here."

It's not just that water is transparent, but that it intrinsically is blue if enough volume exists. The colour is uniform enough throughout the panels that it is more supportive of water as the substance- besides, hydrofluoric acid in a long, tall glassy column in the middle of a entertainment district, which could potentially be ruptured and cause a very large mess? I doubt it.

Lastly, I only pointed out the jellyfish at the end for sizes because I always find it cool just how HUGE they are. ^_^ I really love the fact that I can be floating there and have one beside me and be shorter than it is. It's very humbling to be so small against something so primitive yet enduring through the eons.

In the end though, Dan's probably got it right... they're meant to be jellyfish in the abstract, and I nitpicked at them as if there was a real concern for them not being biologically correct. >_>; My bad.
They look like normal jellyfish to me. Abstract, like a lot of the backgrounds in the comic, but that's part of the appeal.
Sheela
*blink* *blink*

Whoa ... so much text !
I wonder what it says ?

*pokes wall-o-text*

:D
Phuji
tl;dr

Let's pretend it's not critique of the way they are drawn on this page by someone who is not likely to be a marine biologist.
Sheela
I just looked at the pretty pictures. :)

Edit :
And poke the text, offcourse.
re: sketch stuff, i honestly prefer your art uncolored. nmg/the porn ones were super cool and interesting because the sketchiness of it gave it a kind of intimate quality that is necessarily lost with a more "refined" coloring approach

i should also point out that your comics make me intensely jealous of your artistic ability--i can't explain how frustrating it is to have a fully formed comic just sitting in my head, but be completely unable to draw it

keep it up